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Can caffeine act as viagra

Can caffeine act as viagra


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Recently I studied that cAMP which is a 2° messenger can cause various physiolocal changes under the action of proper hormones. Now cAMP is degraded by phosphodiesterase and this ceases the actions. Viagra drugs like sildenafil are phophodiesterase inhibitors and therefore prolong cAMP action. Also caffeine inhibits phosphodiesterase and therefore it should cause a similar phenomenon. But does it actually happen? Or some other mechanism stop it from happening. What are those mechanisms?


Not much luck there. Although caffeine, sildenafil and cGMP share a basic ring structure, the specificity and potency of caffeine for PDE5 is rather underwhelming:

On the basis of comparative IC50 values, the potency of sildenafil is about 1 million times higher than that of caffeine (Corbin and Francis, 1999).


Viagra works in response to sexual stimulation to increase the blood flow to the penis leading to an erection. Viagra does not result in an erection without sexual stimulation.

When a man is aroused, muscles in the penis relax to allow this greater blood flow. Viagra helps to elevate the levels of a substance (cyclic guanosine monophosphate, or cGMP) that causes the tissues to relax, leads to an inflow of blood, and causes an erection with sexual stimulation.

So how does it relax the muscles?

To understand how Viagra works we need to understand how an erection comes about.

Nitric Oxide (NO) is released with sexual stimulation from nerve endings and endothelial cells in the corpus cavernosum of the penis. An enzyme then converts guanosine triphosphate (GTP) into cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP). cGMP causes the smooth muscle of the penis to relax, which causes an inflow of blood which then leads to an erection. cGMP is then hydrolysed back to the inactive GMP by phosphodiesteras type 5 (PDE5).

Men who suffer from erectile dysfunction often produce too little amounts of NO. This means that the small amount of cGMP they produce is broken down at the same rate and therefore doesn't have the time to accumulate and cause a prolonged vasodilation effect.
Sildenafil (Viagra) works by inhibiting the enzyme PDE5. This means that cGMP is not hydrolysed as fast and this allows the smooth muscle to relax.

Sildenafil is a potent and highly selective inhibitor of PDE5.

These meds only work when sexually aroused because the brain really is the master sex organ. Only when visual, tactile, or other stimuli cause the "thought" of sex are hormones released from the brain to begin the cascade of events that result in an erection. Sometimes something blocks a step toward that end. Viagra removes the block so things can proceed normally. Until the process begins, there is nothing for Viagra to do.

When a man is sexually excited, viagra helps the penis fill with enough blood to cause an erection. it is taken about an hour before intercourse.

my hubby is usually good to go after 30 minutes of taking it . but 45 minutes to an hour really allows the med to give him and me the full "effect" .

Simple notes how viagra work: Viagra Inhibits an enzyme called phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE-5), making muscle in the penis more likely to relax and allowing blood to flow in, causing an erection.


Viagra works by stopping the chemical reaction that causes blood to leave an erect penis. Viagra blocks cGMP-specific phosphodiesterase type-5 (PDE-5), an enzyme that encourages blood to flow out of the penis. When PDE-5 is inhibited, levels of cGMP remain elevated, which relaxes smooth muscle and encourages blood vessels to widen (a process known as vasodilation). That makes blood flow more freely, including to the penis.

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Viagra doesn’t work automatically. You must feel sexually aroused to experience its effects.


7 Reasons You're So Sensitive To Caffeine

We all have coworkers who can down six cups of coffee in a given day without flinching, and friends who can indulge in an after-dinner cappuccino and be sleeping like a baby within the hour. Yet a single cup leaves many of us feeling jittery, anxious and restless. What gives?

To be sure, coffee is safe. According to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, the average American consumes 300 milligrams of caffeine each day, and the Mayo Clinic says it is safe for adults to consume upward of 400 milligrams daily -- the equivalent of four cups of coffee. It is our most popular caffeine delivery mechanism by magnitudes, and provides quite a few health benefits as well. Research shows that moderate coffee consumption can help ward off liver disease, provide a big boost of antioxidants and even protect the brain against Parkinson's disease.

While the health recommendations surrounding caffeine consumption have been standardized over the years, one's personal reaction to the stimulant cannot be summed up in a similar fashion. Most of us consume caffeine in some form (coffee, tea, soda, even chocolate) frequently, but the ways our bodies process the chemical varies based on several key factors, some of which you'd never suspect.

Here are seven reasons you might be more sensitive to the effects of caffeine than the standard java junkie.

You don't consume that much of it.

It sounds counterintuitive, but people who don't consume caffeine regularly and in moderate amounts tend to feel its negative side effects more strongly than those who have already developed a tolerance for the substance. The way that tolerance is built is under review by countless researchers, but studies suggest that consistent caffeine consumption leads to the brain's decreased production of mood-enhancing hormone norepinephrine, leaving the body craving the substance that fills that void.

Your genetics are to blame.

The reason so many people feel a "boost" after consuming caffeine isn't because it supplies that boost instead, it binds to the brain's adenosine receptors (which signal to the to body that it's time for rest when their number reach a particular limit) and allows naturally occurring stimulants like dopamine to function without restriction. The brain's sensitivity to caffeine can vary dramatically from person to person, depending on how many of one's adenosine receptors bind to the caffeine after it's consumed. People whose receptors bind more effectively to the caffeine tend to feel a more intense jitteriness.

The culprit lies in your medicine cabinet.

According to the Mayo Clinc, certain antibiotics, asthma-relief drugs and echinacea increase the intensity of unwanted caffeine side effects. While antibiotics and echinacea can interfere with the metabolism of caffeine, leaving it circulating through the body for longer periods of time and in higher amounts, asthma-relief drug theophylline already has caffeine-like side effects of its own, making the combined effects feel even more uncomfortable.

You suffer from an anxiety disorder.

If you already deal with an anxiety disorder on a daily basis, high levels of caffeine will likely intensify your symptoms. According to Roland Griffiths, Ph.D., a professor at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, "Caffeine is the most widely used mood-altering drug in the world." Because of its psychoactive nature, in rare instances, caffeine can provoke anxiety and panic disorders, promoting panic attacks in those who suffer from panic disorders and cause insomnia those who are susceptible to panic attacks.

Your metabolism is on the slower side.

An enzyme in the liver that helps the body metabolize caffeine can vary in quantity from person to person, affecting one's ability to handle caffeine comfortably. Those who produce less of this metabolizing enzyme then take longer to rid the body of it, leaving it the system longer and making its side effects feel more intense and prolonged. Conversely, those with a greater amount of caffeine-metabolizing enzymes in the liver must consume more (and more frequently) to maintain its desired side effects.

You have a Y-chromosome.

Sorry boys, the body processes caffeine differently based on gender, and women naturally metabolize it more quickly. A study from researchers at the University of Barcelona found that among a group of university-age students, a standardized amount of caffeine affects both men and women within just 10 minutes of consumption, and that while it affects both genders, men feel the impacts more strongly.

You're on the pill.

However, there is a caveat to the whole being-a-woman-and-metabolizing-caffeine-faster thing: If you're using oral contraceptives, you will likely metabolize caffeine at one-third of the rate you would otherwise, leaving you far more sensitive to its side effects. Typically, at the end of caffeine's life cycle, it's excreted from the body and takes a given amount of important minerals like calcium, zinc and potassium along with it. According to one study, young women on the pill lost fewer amounts of these minerals because the active component in the metabolism of caffeine was limited by the hormonal steroid. So while fewer nutrients are lost, the caffeine (and its side effects) remain in the body for a longer period of time.


Atrial fibrillation: What triggers an A-fib attack?

Atrial fibrillation is an irregular, rapid heartbeat. During an atrial fibrillation attack, the heart might not pump enough oxygen-rich blood to the rest of the body, leading to symptoms including weakness, light-headedness, and dizziness.

Atrial fibrillation (A-fib) itself is not usually life-threatening but it can lead to serious complications, such as a stroke or new or worsening heart failure.

Though there are many treatments available, a person can take more control over A-fib by knowing and avoiding common A-fib triggers.

Share on Pinterest An A-fib flare may be caused by travel. People with A-fib should stay hydrated and have enough sleep when traveling.

As with many medical conditions, certain situations and factors can contribute to attacks or flares. Here are some potential triggers that may cause A-fib to flare in people:

  • Travel. Taking a trip can cause an A-fib attack due to a person becoming overtired, the stress of travel, and changes in sleep patterns – all of which can trigger the fight-or-flight response. When traveling, people with A-fib should be sure to get enough sleep, stay hydrated, and not skip meals.
  • Medical procedures. Heart surgery is often associated with an A-fib attack. Any surgery that causes stress in a person can also trigger an attack. A patient with A-fib should let their doctor know before undergoing any medical procedure, even a minor one.
  • Exercise. Low or moderate intensity exercise is generally considered good for a person with A-fib. However, a sudden increase in exercise or a workout that is too intense can trigger an A-fib attack. Getting overheated or dehydrated while exercising can also trigger attacks.
  • Holidays. Holidays offer many triggers, including stress, fatigue, and alcohol use. Any one of these alone can be a trigger but when combined, they create a much higher risk of an A-fib attack.
  • Alcohol. People with A-fib should significantly reduce their alcohol intake. Although there is no recommendation that works for all people, minimal to moderate consumption is usually best. Alcohol consumption has an especially irritating effect on the heart, and binge drinking is a major A-fib trigger.
  • Stress. Stress is a very common trigger for A-fib. For this reason, people with A-fib need to be able to identify personal stressors and take steps to avoid or reduce them. If they can’t rule out all causes of stress, practicing stress-reduction techniques, such as yoga, deep breathing, Tai chi, or autogenic practices, can lessen the impact.
  • Fatigue. Extreme fatigue can trigger an A-fib attack because it puts stress on a person’s body. Sleep deprivation or physical exhaustion can both play a role in triggering an A-fib attack.
  • Air pollution. A-fib attacks may have a link with air pollution. People living in areas with high levels of air pollution have been shown to have increased attacks of A-fib compared to others living in less polluted areas. In these cases, the problem appears to be the very fine particles of pollution released from cars and power plants. These particles move deep into the lungs and trigger attacks.
  • Dehydration. Lack of electrolytes in the blood associated with dehydration, especially potassium, can trigger A-fib symptoms. Dehydration occurs during exercise, hot weather, and illness that causes vomiting or diarrhea.
  • Caffeine. Traditionally, doctors have considered caffeine consumption from drinks, such as coffee, tea, and soda as a trigger for A-fib. However, more recent evidence suggests that A-fib might not be triggered by caffeine intake. Doctors are likely to suggest that people with A-fib avoid caffeine or drink it in moderation until there is more proof that caffeine has no ill effects on A-fib.
  • Over-the-counter drugs. Over-the-counter cold, flu, and cough medications can trigger A-fib attacks because these medications stimulate the heart.
  • Recreational drugs. Marijuana can stimulate the heart through raising the heart rate by a significant percent for several hours. Other drugs such as cocaine can also trigger an abnormal heartbeat. Abusing cough or cold medication for recreational use can also trigger an A-fib attack.

Avoiding an A-fib attack will largely depend on the individual. What works for one person with A-fib may not work for another. Equally, what might trigger A-fib attacks in one person may not have the same effect in another.

In general, a person with A-fib should do the following to reduce attacks:

  • avoid or reduce stress
  • take part in well-monitored, light exercise
  • get plenty of rest
  • stay hydrated
  • avoid things that have caused an A-fib reaction in the past

Lifestyle tips

Avoiding A-fib attacks is not always easy. Often the best method to avoid A-fib attacks is to make some lifestyle changes.

Some lifestyle changes that may help can include:

  • taking part in moderate exercise a few times a week
  • increasing the number of hours spent sleeping
  • decreasing or avoiding stressful situations
  • avoiding alcohol or drinking only in moderation
  • eating heart-healthy meals and snacks
  • maintaining a healthy weight
  • following a doctor’s recommendations and taking prescribed medications

In general, following a healthful lifestyle can help a person avoid an A-fib attack. Improving overall health should help most people avoid signs and symptoms of the condition.

A-fib is commonly caused by changes or damage to the heart’s structure. Possible causes of A-fib include:

Though these are common causes of A-fib, some people have A-fib without any heart defects or damage. This condition is called lone atrial fibrillation. The cause of lone atrial fibrillation is not always clear. However, serious complications for this condition are rare.


Caffeine and Erectile Dysfunction

Since caffeine is found in beverages that have additional health effects, such as the beneficial antioxidants in coffee and tea, or the less beneficial sugars in energy drinks, it can be challenging for researchers to tease out which effects are caffeine-related and which effects are from other substances. Coffee, for example, contains hundreds of compounds that can impact human health. A review article published in the September 2013 issue of "Journal of American College of Cardiology" reported that regular coffee consumption was either neutral or beneficial to a variety of health outcomes, including heart disease, diabetes and death from all causes. Caffeine seems to also favorably influence ED. A study published in the April 2015 issue of "PLoS One" analyzed self-reported data from over 3700 men, and linked 2 to 3 daily cups of coffee daily to a reduced risk of ED.


People aren't truly "addicted" to caffeine.

People who consume caffeine every day are most likely dependent on the drug, and it does produce symptoms of dependence, Lane said. But addiction is not the best way to describe it, he said.

Caffeine use is socially acceptable, and because people who consume it in large amounts aren't thought of as acting like addicts, society doesn't put its overuse in the same category as that of other drugs, Lane said. [5 'Hidden' Sources of Caffeine]

Caffeine is not highly addictive, said Dr. Peter Martin, a professor of psychiatry and pharmacology at Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, and the director of the Institute for Coffee Studies at Vanderbilt University in Nashville.

Generally, people's need for caffeine is a different order of magnitude compared with an addiction to opioid drugs or cocaine, Martin said. "Caffeine has minor-league side effects compared with real addictive drugs," he said.

A person might say, "I'm addicted to coffee," to describe their habitual need for caffeine, but Martin, who is a specialist in addiction psychiatry, said he would ask that individual, "When was the last time you robbed a bank to get money to buy coffee?"


Caffeine & Neurotransmitters

Within minutes after you drink your coffee or tea, caffeine is carried by your bloodstream to all your organs and virtually every cell in your body. Because caffeine is fat soluble, it passes easily through all cell membranes: It is quickly and completely absorbed from the stomach and intestines into the blood stream, which carries it to all the organs. Caffeine permeates organs more rapidly than most other drugs, but not more rapidly than alcohol. And because there are no significant physiological barriers that hinder its passage through tissue throughout the human body, the concentrations attained by caffeine are virtually the same throughout the body and in blood, saliva, and even breast milk and semen.


Many of caffeine’s powers depend on its power to pass into the central nervous system (CNS). To enter the CNS, caffeine must cross the blood-brain barrier, a defensive mechanism that protects the CNS from biological or chemical exposure by preventing viruses and other large (and most small) molecules from entering the brain or its surrounding fluid. Even when injected into the bloodstream, many drugs fail to penetrate this barrier, and others enter it much less rapidly than they enter other tissues. However, caffeine passes through the blood-brain barrier as if it did not exist.

All psychoactive drugs, including caffeine, achieve their effects by imitating or altering the release or uptake of neurotransmitters, the chemical messengers that direct how the neurons of the CNS interact with each other. Neurotransmitters are altered by drugs in a variety of ways, including increasing or decreasing their synthesis, inhibiting or enhancing their transport, modifying their storage, release, or the way they are degraded, or simply by directly mimicking their activity or, alternatively, by blocking their action at the receptor site.

Neurotransmitters - Venn Diagram

Caffeine achieves many of its effects by blocking the activity of adenosine, a neurotransmitter that affects almost every bodily system. Because one of the primary actions of adenosine is to make us tired or sleepy, caffeine, by blocking the uptake of adenosine, keeps us from feeling the effects of fatigue. But scientists have learned that, largely as a consequence of its blockade of adenosine receptors, caffeine also has profound effects on most of the other major neurotransmitters, including dopamine, acetylcholine, serotonin, and, in high doses, on norepinephrine. By affecting these other neurotransmitters, it is able to deliver a major boost to our capacities even when we are well-rested, something that could not be explained by the inhibition of adenosine alone. By increasing the transmission of dopamine, caffeine improves our mood and may protect brain cells from age and disease related degeneration. By increasing the activity of acetylcholine, caffeine increases muscular activity and may also improve long-term memory. By raising and adjusting serotonin levels, caffeine relieves depression, makes us more relaxed, alert, and energetic, and relieves migraine headaches.

Neurotransmitters - Venn Diagram 2

The full story of caffeine’s intricate mechanism of action is still only partially understood by pharmacologists and physicians. And though caffeine is probably the most widely studied drug in history, the effort to penetrate its mysteries continues today. Animal studies are problematic, because rats, mice, cats, dogs, and monkeys process caffeine very differently from each other and very differently from human beings. Human studies are sometimes bedeviled by the individual differences in the quality of responses to caffeine and differences in the rate at which it is metabolized by different people and at different times. Finally, there is the unique problem that, because almost everyone already uses caffeine, it is difficult to determine what they would be like without it.

However, even if we don’t know all the answers about how caffeine works, we can classify the two major effects caffeine has on our neurotransmitters by which it achieves its magic:

  • Caffeine alters the production or uptake of many neurotransmitters so as to increase mental and physical energy and enhance performance and
  • Caffeine regulates the balance of many neurotransmitters, in ways that enhance our moods, kill pain, suppress our appetite, and even protect our brain cells from damage and disease.

Caffeine’s Neurotransmitter Mediated Benefits

Caffeine, by acting to modifying and regulate a host of the body’s neurotransmitters, enables us to tap into our hidden potential in four major areas:

Sharpens reasoning, memory, verbal fluency, concentration, and decision-making and heightens sensuous perception.

Enhances moods, increases relaxation, relieves boredom, boosts self-confidence.

Improves speed, endurance, energy output, strength, and reaction time, and increases thermogenesis, that is, fat burning and metabolic rate.

Protects body cells and especially brain cells from some kinds of long-term damage and delivers many other specific therapeutic benefits including pain relief and protection from the pulmonary complications of smoking and the damage from strokes.

48 Responses to Caffeine & Neurotransmitters

Have you noticed the author who is Bennett Alan Weinberg is Jewish has no problem recommending caffeine to the Gentiles even though he is Jewish. However we never see Jewish people drinking lots of caffeine.

I have severe chronic facial pain due to post shingles neuralgia. Have been to 8 or 9 doctors, and three major medical centers seeking relief from this pain which has greatly decreased my quality of life. The standard medications do not help and doctors are scared to provide pain medications that are really effective due to the DEA’s opioid witch hunt. I have found that a cup of coffee or tea significantly reduces the neuralgia pain, at least temporarily( the relief lasts about 3-4 hours). I assume this is due to caffeine increasing the production of dopamine, serotonin, and other neurotransmitters involved in pain relief.
So for me, caffeine relieves pain that the medical profession has not been able to help me with.
Ironically the doctors I have seen will not prescribe medications that do the same thing caffeine does.

Hello, my name is Brock and I am doing an assignment on Caffeine, where a hypothetical company is marketing energy drinks (containing Caffeine) to teenagers as a long term tonic to help with their studies. What are your thoughts on this? It claims with 340 mg it will,
‘Boosts your brain activity’
‘Boosts your alertness’
‘Boosts your endurance’

Your research seems to be in favour of these claims however, do they still stand for teenagers?
Thanks Brock.

Are there any studies on the affects caffeine might have on a Parkinson patience ?

If you mean caffeine’s effect on Parkinson’s disease, studies over the last 60 years have proven that the more caffeine you consume, the lower the changes of contracting Parkinson’s. If you consume a few hundred milligrams a day, you changes of getting this illness are reduced by more than half.

What in case of paralysis of left limb after stroke upper and lower arm and like left hand?

Caffeine affects the central nervous system and therefore can affect muscles through nerve signals from the brain. But it also augments muscle action peripherally and therefore just might help a paralyzed limb after a stroke.

Thank you for this!
This wasn’t just informative but also an interesting read

I agree, I have to have a cup of coffee, daily. I learned a lot about how my body functions with caffeine.

Your research is comprehensive …Thank you! Your visuals–the best yet for armchair researchers to understand. Thank you! I’d love for you to take your expertise into researching whether caffeine can bond with other molecules, like fats, and port it into the brain in order to continue to keep …I think its called… Mylin … No that’s not it.. The slippery stuff our brain needs..myelin(?) juicey in order for neuronal transmission to occur w ease. I began reading about fats+brain development during when I was adopting my babies who thru insult during pregnancy were taken away from their birth mother. But 14 years later, my daughter continues to show more anxiety, more need for add drugs to regulate her fopine, serotonin, and epinephrine. And still she has little focus. I’m reading a website for “bulletproof coffee” where a “biotech” believes caffeine can deliver fats to the brain to increase alertness and focus. I’m experimenting on myself. I find myself to feel full after one large cup of coffee a generous pay of butter @ 7:30a til10:30a when I begin to feel a hollow place in my stomach. I also feel much more focused then if I just had my usual two cups coffee @ 7:30a. But is it the placebo effect?(rhetorical) Not sure. I would love and forever appreciate your investigation into the efficacy of this premise of caffeine delivered fats to the brain. -Mary

Thank you for your favorable comments about our web site. Caffeine is fat soluble and passes the blood-brain barrier as if it did not exist, but I’m afraid I don’t know anything about caffeine increasing the delivery of fats to the brain. The brain is about half fat, and a healthy brain requires fat. But as far as butter increasing your “focus,” I can’t offer any comment. I will try to look into this, but, meanwhile, you should continue to try whatever seems to be helping.

Thank you for getting back to me. This is the website of the strategist behind the premise that caffeine can deliver fats into the brain: https://www.bulletproofexec.com/about-dave-asprey/

My thoughts though— why butter? Why not olive or almond oil? I’ll wait til I see what resources you offer. Thank you again! -Mary

This Bulletproof Coffee sounds like a fraud and a scam to me. The mention of “grass fed” butter is an automatic clue that it’s nonsense. Grass fed beef is just low quality, commercial grade beef, below the standard of either choice or prime beef. You see, good beef must be fed with grain, so that the beef is marbled, which is to say, tasty and succulent. All choice or prime meat, which is to say, good beef, is grain fed. Grass fed beef is dry and stringy and almost inedible. I don’t know what any of this has to do with caffeine and fat delivery to the brain, but my first thought is to stay far away from this questionable product.

Bennett, although grain fed beef might be more flavorful based on the long established conditioning of our palettes and thereby of higher quality it is lacking in many nutritional components.

In relation to the fat discussion grass fed beef is much higher in essential fatty acids that offer a myriad of benefits those of a neurological nature.

Another massive reason to reconsider your opinion on grain fed beef is that cattle raised thusly tend to be extremely unhealthy requiring large doses of antibiotics.

It’s really worth it to recondition that corn fed palette of yours, for many reasons.

There is nothing to “reconsider.” Corn fed beef is succulent and tastes great. Grass fed beef is dry, tough, and has almost no flavor. I couldn’t eat that junk no matter what you think about its “fatty acids.” If you think corn fed beef is unhealthy, I suggest that you stick to chicken or vegetables. But it is sheer nonsense to attack corn fed beef as requiring antibiotics, as this is simply not true.

Bennett, what are your thoughts on caffeine and it’s effects on the adrenal glands and subsequently the rest of the endocrine system? .

Sorry, I don’t know much about this. This is a quotation from this website:Activation of “central noradrenergic [adrenalin] pathways that constitute an endogenous pain suppressing system,” which means that caffeine stimulates the body’s own pain killing mechanism.”

By your logic cake tastes better than celery, so cake is better for you.

Look into the facts. Corn makes cows sick.

Maybe you should stay away from corn? In any case, your comment has nothing whatever to do with the quality and flavor of coffee!

I got a little confused because I read an article that recommends reducing caffeine in order to boost dopamine activity. The article goes on to say that caffeine initial boost is replaced by a big let-down (my own words). So, my objective is to increase dopamine levels in a natural way. What am I not understanding properly here?

I know of no evidence that dopamine levels are decreased by caffeine use. In fact, based on the profile of caffeine’s many beneficial effects on memory, energy, concentration, etc., etc., we would have to say that, if anything, caffeine increases the effects for which dopamine is recognized.

Thanks for all the helpful information available on this site (articles and comments)! What is the recommended dose and/or form of caffeine to enhance/improve your cognitive abilities?

There are no “forms” of caffeine. However, some researchers think that some of the ingredients in coffee mitigate against some of caffeine’s benefits. Therefore, to be sure getting the most from caffeine, pills or tablets are your best bet. As afar as dose, that depends on your sensitivity to caffeine. Factors that affect this sensitivity include your genetics, medicines you are taking, foods you are eating, your weight, and even if you are an introvert or extravert. The only way to know what caffeine will do for your cognitive powers is to experiment. You will find a Caffeine IQ test on this site. Check it out!

Thanks so much for your help! By saying “forms” of caffeine, what I meant was is it better to drink coffee, tea, or energy drinks take pills, eat candy, or some other way. You answered my question so thank you. What foods are commonly known to interact with caffeine? Are there certain foods, or is it the amount of food that hinders absorption or functioning? I’m finishing my degree in psychology, and I was originally only interested in finding a way of helping me focus, be more alert, and have more energy in general, but I find this fascinating! Thank you again!

The best recommendation I can give to you is to check out our book The Caffeine Advantage. There are discussions of foods, drugs, and other factors that influence how caffeine affects you. Also, the One-minute IQ Test seems to have disappeared from the web site! You will find this test in The Caffeine Advantage, and I think you will find it interesting as well. Please keep in touch and good luck with your studies!

I have moderate to severe GERD and am using Jet Alert 200mg Softgel. I find the 200mg softgel version is easier on my acid reflux than even a lower 100mg hard tablet caffeine (Jet Alert), let alone “any” other brand of 200mg hard tablet (Vivarin, No Doze, etc), none of which I can tolerate.

But an enteric coated caffeine would be best for me if I could find one, ideally an otc enteric coated softgel.

I not only have long-term acid reflux but, as of 15 years or so ago, I also have had a hiatal hernia. A hiatal hernia makes acid reflux far worse by directly allowing the acid to go up the esophagus.

I am a longhaul otr truckdriver, so unfortunately, caffeine is a necessary part of my life, despite my acid reflux. So years ago, I suggested to Bell Pharmaceuticals, Inc the maker of Jet Alert (in a phone call to one of their top level guys in their lab, about 10-15 years ago) that they manufacture a softgel/enteric caffeine. I actually GAVE them the idea for that product one afternoon. But I’m sure they don’t remember it since I’m not a millionaire yet, lol. I figured such a product would be far easier on my GERD than a hard tablet caffeine.

They eventually did make a softgel version, but I am still needing the final piece, the enteric coating. I have actually considered seeing how expensive it would be to have a compounding pharmacy put an enteric coating on the Jet Alert softgel. If anyone here has any thoughts on an enteric coated softgel caffeine pill, where it might be available, or where to get it done economically, please advise me.

Btw, you all may find this interesting, I have determined by personal experience that the reason a softgel is SO much better than a hard tablet for GERD is that the caffeine primarily stimulates the acid production from INSIDE the stomach (NOT so much from the bloodstream side). It is interesting that this is the exact opposite of what many doctors think, including the gastroenterologist I was seeing back then. My gastroenterologist advised me about 15 years ago (incorrectly) that an enteric coating on a caffeine pill to keep it from dissolving in the stomach, would have no effect on acid production, since (he believed-incorrectly) that the caffeine was primarily stimulating the acid from the bloodstream side. This made no sense to me at the time due to the sheer speed of the onset of acid reflux following taking a caffeine pill (a minute or two). I figured the caffeine “acid stimulation effect” HAD to be coming from the initial release of caffeine into the stomach, but I reluctantly decided to believe that he probably knew what he was talking about, and consequently gave up my search for a way to get an enteric coated caffeine pill.

However, in the past few years, since Bell Pharmaceuticals came out with a softgel caffeine, I have found that my original supposition was correct, and the gastroenterologist was wrong. A softgel caffeine releases all at once in the stomach, and is consequently rapidly absorbed into the bloodstream. A hard tablet, by contrast, takes a much longer time to dissolve and absorb, and causes CONTINUOUS acid production till it is fully absorbed by the stomach. Make no mistake, once the caffeine is in the blood, it very rapidly diffuses throughout the body, & consequently has little effect on the acid production from the bloodstream side, at least compared to the immediate & powerful primary acid stimulating effect caffeine has from INSIDE the stomach. Once in the bloodstream, the caffeine is spread out from head to toe and is not any more or less a stimulator of stomach acid than it is of any other body part. The primary acid stimulation occurs during the window of time while it is still in the stomach. Incidentally, I would bet no one has ever actually formally studied this to compare the two stimulating effects, which could be done using an IV source of caffeine (to establish a baseline for how much stomach acid is produced with a given amount of caffeine administered completely from the bloodstream side) versus a standard non-enteric hard tablet versus an enteric softgel (this is a hint for grad students looking 4 a thesis idea!).

Therefore the secret key to using caffeine with little additional stomach acid production, is to get the caffeine thru the stomach lining & OUT asap! A softgel accomplishes this absorption very quickly. However, as I have stated, even better than that would be an enteric coating on the softgel, which would put the caffeine beyond the stomach entirely, but still have a fairly quick effect. The problem with an enteric coating is it slows down the alertness effect, especially on a full stomach, since the pill would not dissolve until it got beyond the stomach. However a softgel design would partially counter that delay by speeding the absorption back up a bit once it did get in the intestine. An enteric coated softgel would release and be absorbed by the intestine a bit faster than an enteric coated powder capsule, and a lot faster than an enteric coated hard tablet. One could also put additional caffeine in some sort of time delayed, dissolving microbeads that would be timed to dissolve even later in the intestine in order to counter the half-life of caffeine. Perhaps, 400-600 mg released over 10 hours or so. This would be a great idea for a deluxe caffeine product.

One additional point is that Rhodiola Rosea extract will magnify the effectiveness of caffeine. I use Jarrow Formulas, which has 5% Rosavins, which is the active ingredient. In time, I would expect to see this herbal ingredient added to some caffeine products. I imagine Rhodiola could also be used in a deluxe caffeine pill, in order to reduce the amount of caffeine while retaining the effectiveness of a higher amount, for the use of people who were sensitive to higher amounts of caffeine. Or to increase the alertness effect for others without increasing the caffeine amount.

If anyone has any input on how or where to get buy an enteric coated softgel caffeine pill, or an economical service to do so, I would be keen to get your advice. Thanks.


Can caffeine act as viagra - Biology

Caffeine side effects: Does caffeine affect test scores?

The average person consumes caffeine on a daily basis. We wake up, we brew our cup of Joe and use the caffeine to propel us throughout our day. But for students, what caffeine side effects matter? Surprisingly, studies have shown that coffee consumption in college students may have an effect on test scores.

The Nutrition Journal in 2007 published a study in which 51% of 496 college students who regularly consumed coffee to help them with test preparation. Some Psychopharmacologists have concluded that this inevitably gave the students an advantage. Additionally three studies published by John Wiley and Sons in Human Psychopharmacology “put caffeine as an advantage”.

Moderation is key

Experts caution the crash and burn affect that caffeine can have on the system. Like most things in live, moderation is key. The brain can function on a higher level but only for a short period of time, leaving individuals feeling jittery, irritable and dehydrated. An important factor, however, was the amount consumed.

Caffeine has many health benefits including reducing your risk of diabetes, gallstones, Parkinson’s disease and liver disease. Drinking too much, however, can cause issues such as stomach problems, headaches, jittery feeling and dizziness.

It’s important as a college student to understand your limitation with caffeine. Whether you’re popping five hour energy drinks, midnight runs to grab Redbull or getting coffee from espresso machine you should know your limits with caffeine.

In this article from UCSB one student discusses their usage of coffee and managing their intake. Being left with a jittery feeling was improved when the student reduced her dependence on caffeine. In moderation, the effect can still be felt to help you with your students or get you through the day.

Plan your study time

Students should develop good study habits as well as maintain a properly balanced diet to get the most from their studying. Caffeine can help with all-nighters, getting you through those tough times but in the end it often comes down to:

  • Planning your study ahead of time instead of cramming during the school year by developing good study habits and taking practice tests
  • Avoid caffeine just prior to a test, as it could cause increased anxiety
  • Don’t let your brain start working on the next problem before finishing the current one
  • Stay focused, try not to let your mind wander or worry
  • Avoid distractions during your study, take this seriously and just like you would a full-time job!

Prevent burnout

It’s likely that if you’re a student you’re currently using caffeine to help you get through. Late nights, long days or early mornings – the caffeine is there. Take a step back and really evaluate your consumption. It could be time for you to reevaluate your use of caffeine today. Think about alternatives as well such as using exercise to give you energy, eating better and getting enough sleep. Manage your caffeine usage appropriately and higher test scores are bound to come along!


Also, avoid over-the-counter stimulants…

What to Do If You Suspect Drug Interaction

If you suspect that caffeine is interacting with one of the above prescription drugs or another drug you are taking, it’s important to follow the following steps to ensure your safety.

  1. Call your doctor and discuss the situation as there may be alternative treatments.
  2. Never stop taking either the prescription medication or caffeine until you get instructions from your doctor.
  3. If reactions are severe, seek immediate medical attention.
  4. If the doctor tells you to avoid caffeine, gradually step down consumption to lessen withdrawal symptoms.
  5. Use our caffeine database to be aware of drinks or food that could contain hidden caffeine.

Being proactive in understanding the prescription medication you are taking and its possible interactions with caffeine and other drugs can go a long way in ensuring your safety and assisting the drug’s likelihood of treating your illness as intended.

Disclaimer

This page is for informational purposes and not intended to diagnose or treat any medical condition. Always consult your physician if you expect possible caffeine and prescription drug adverse interaction.

It may seem daunting to read over all the safety information that now comes with most medications, but usually, your pharmacist will be happy to help you understand the often complex information.

Taking a little time to understand the drug you have been prescribed can prevent severe unwanted side effects which could result from caffeine’s interaction.



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